Tuesday, November 20, 2012

November Astrophotography

All of these are 30 second shots taken through a 6" refractor telescope. I knock down the resolution a bit so that they don't take forever to load. The only editing I do is to remove an annoying blue halo that I get on the brightest stars. I don't do any sharpening or stacking or cropping, so these pictures are pretty much right out of the box. As always, clicking causes embignification.
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This is M79, a nice globular cluster in Lepus.
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M50 is a lovely open cluster in Monoceros, which is in the Milky Way.
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M41, a bright, open cluster in Canis Major, The Big Dog, which is also in the Milky Way.
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This is a two-fer, M81 and M82, galaxies in Ursa Major, The Great Bear. The Big Dipper is part of Ursa Major. The really cool thing about taking a long-exposure picture is that it brings out details that the eye can't see otherwise. In the telescope, these two galaxies are faint smudges.
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M35, an open cluster in Gemini, considered to be one of the most beautiful in the sky.

I want you to know that I suffer for my art. Staying up all night is tough, the bug bites are irritating as hell, and I'm constantly shooing away rattlesnakes and scorpions. The damn howling coyotes break my concentration, and I've been dive-bombed by owls.

Posted by Dave

4 comments:

  1. Better owls than bats! Being of the "Star Wars" generation, I've always been fascinated by space. Sure wish I could fire up the Millennium Falcon and jump to another galaxy...

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    1. Hi Craig,

      Yup. Me too.

      As I recall, the Millennium Falcon had constant mechanical problems, mostly from being shot at, so your repair skills would come in handy. :-)

      We've got bats here too, but they don't bother me unless I unwittingly corner one. Vicious little hissers, they are.

      Dave

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  2. Very nice photos. My wife and I have been into astonomy for a couple yrs now and we own a 6 & 10" reflector on dob mounts. She just bought me a Canon 400D for xmas and I cant wait to start Astro imaging. Me biggest fear atm is being stuck to 30 second exposures until I learn to manual guide or get an equatorial mount to support the 6 or 10" that can guide alone. Im shocked you dont have a pic of Orion up as it seems to be one of the easiest to spot and shoot. Thanks for sharing your hobby with the world. Clear skies to ya, oh and clear land animals and insects too :-)

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    Replies
    1. Hi James,

      Thanks. Photography brings out lots of interesting things like nebula colors, satellite trails, and faint stars.

      If you scroll down further in my blog, I have a 6-minute exposure, autoguided pic of the fabulous Orion Nebula.

      I'm still learning the ins and outs of astrophotography. Lots to know. Good luck with your new camera. E-mail me if you have any questions.

      Dave

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All comments are welcome.